It’s a difficult feeling when you are suffering from depression, but have no desire to take medication to help you recover. Whether to take medication for mental health issues such as depression is much debated, but at the end of the day, it comes down to the choice that you’ll make together with your doctor about what’s best for you.

If you have decided that dealing with the potential side effects of taking medication isn’t for you just yet, what can you do? It’s great that you’re feeling ready and strong enough to get help. Here are some ideas to try.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Today, we’re seeing an increase in doctors who are prescribing therapy, rather than medication, to patients suffering from depression. Whilst medication can certainly work to help balance out the chemicals in your brain leading to relief from symptoms, many patients run the risk of going right back to square one as soon as they try to wean themselves off the pills.

On the other hand, cognitive behavioral therapy is different in that it tackles ingrained habits and behaviors. Working closely with a trained psychologist or counselor, you will talk about how you deal with your mental health and what you can proactively do to help yourself. In the end, this tends to lead to better results by changing your thoughts and habits for good. You can find drug free depression treatment at Smart Brain and Health.

Mindfulness Meditation

If you know that you’re suffering from depression but don’t feel strong enough to speak to anybody about it just yet, that’s OK. The fact that you’re even reading this shows that you want to do something, so the power is in your hands – you can do this!

Mindfulness meditation is gaining a lot of press these days; chances are you’ve seen it on your social media newsfeeds or even in the news. With ancient roots in Buddhist traditions, mindfulness works by allowing you to gain control over your breathing and thoughts, leading to a stronger connection with yourself and everything around you. Using mindfulness meditation and practices, you can channel your inner strength and help your mind to heal itself from the inside. When you are ready, you might even want to consider signing up for mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, which can be extremely helpful.

Be Selfish

Yes. You’re allowed to be selfish, there’s nothing wrong with putting yourself first – it helps. Depression is no different from a physical illness; if you need to take time off work or cancel your social appointments for a week, then you should.

It can be so hard when you are depressed; it’s not unusual to be unable to get out of bed or struggle to find the motivation to shower. But, remember this; you deserve to be cared for, even if it’s just you, caring for yourself. As you practice mindfulness and work together with your therapist, remember to love yourself. You can do this.

If meds aren’t your thing, then that’s OK. Anti-depressants aren’t for everybody, and there are some great alternatives to try.