In Ireland, most people do not spend a very extended period of time at their first full time job. This is partially due to the times—most people across the world do not have the longevity at their first full time job as they once did—but it is also rooted in some Irish economic problems and issues. Based on information gathered from paid online surveys, here are the facts regarding the duration of first time jobs in Ireland, as well as the reasoning for these numbers.

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The Facts
According to Irish Opinions™, it is rare for Irish workers to maintain their first job for a long period of time, though this varies slightly over different age brackets. Of women aged 15-24 26.8% said that their first job lasted 1-2 years, and another 26.8% 2-5 years. They were also the two most popular answers for every other age bracket among women, with 2-5 years being most popular with 30% of 45-54 and 32% of 55-64 year olds, while 1-2 years was most popular among women between the ages with 32% 25-34, and 32% 35-44.

For men, the numbers were similar, though even more drastic for young men. According to Irish Opinions, Irish males in the 15-24 age bracket were most likely to have had their first full time job last 2 to 5 years with 21% of all 15-24 year olds represented.  Those between the ages of 25-34 and 35-44 most commonly chose 2-5 years, then 1-2 years with 30 and 32% respectively. Irish men ages 45-54 32% said 2-5 years, and those ages 55-64 36% selected 10 or more years.

This slight discrepancy between male and female Irish worker suggests that men had an easier time keeping jobs in decades past, which should not be very surprising given Ireland’s political and social evolution.

The Reasons
Why do Irish workers find themselves unable to stay in their first full time jobs for extended periods of time? Well, the biggest reason is that Ireland is currently facing harsh economic times, which is why the numbers are even more severe for the younger age brackets shown by this paid online survey

The unemployment rate [1] in Ireland is currently very high, meaning that Irish are constantly being laid off or made redundant. Not only does this make it harder for them to retain their jobs, but it also means they’re less likely to be satisfied with their job, and thus more likely to leave of their own volition should a better job opportunity present itself.

Furthermore, more young Irish are entering the workforce without a career in mind. According to Irish Opinions, they simply get a full time job to make spare money, or to bide their time, or provide for their families. While it may have once been true that most Irish workers began their career as soon as they entered the working world, that is now an antiquated way of doing things in Ireland.

One thing is clear from the Irish Opinions poll: Irish workers do not stay at their first full time jobs very long. This is somewhat distressing, but it is not as bad as it seems, as sometimes it is voluntary. Still, it is something that the struggling Irish economy may hope to fix in the coming years.

 

“This article has been written by a third party. The views expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of Research Now or its Irish Opinions™ panel. The statistics referred to in this article were collected from pre-screener questions directed to members of Research Now’s Irish Opinions panel during July 2013. The information is presented without warranty, express or implied.”
1 The Irish Times, www.irishtimes.com

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