Statistics can often make people paranoid, especially when they deal with home injuries and fatalities. WebMD details how most families are unable to identify points of danger at home and how to increase household safety.

1. Poisoning

With a multitude of household cleaners, automotive fluids, and aerosol sprays, the risk of poisoning is high. A child is left unattended near chemicals is at high risk. All poisonous chemicals should have clear labels on their containers. Examine the products being used around the house – residents do not want any harmful ingredients to come into contact with food or water. Have a listing to the local Poison Control Center programmed into a mobile phone in case of emergency.

2. Drowning

Accidental drowning in bathtubs or pools are high risks, especially for those who live alone. Never leave young children unattended near water or during a bath. Even if the drain is clear for releasing water, a bath toy can become lodged in a tub, turning it into a risk. Set pool rules with family and friends to ensure safe practices.

3. Accidental Falls

Slips can happen to any resident of any age. It can occur if walkways are not clear, if liquids are left on the ground without being wiped, during icy or rainy seasons. If there are recurring slip hazards that are left unmarked at a rental apartment building, be sure to notify the maintenance and management offices to reduce potential falls. Residents should fix any leaks, patios, or railings that have become damaged.

4. Fire

Fire-starting materials such as matches and lighters should be stored in a dry, safe place to avoid unintentional use. Cooking, curious children, smokers, and candles can seem innocuous, but can cause major fires, leading to burns and fatalities at home. The US Fire Administration publishes guides on minimizing fire risks at home.

5. Inhalation

Chemical liquids and gasses can lead to unconsciousness, brain injuries, and more. Some landlords require the use of explosive gas detectors at home, especially if there are gas lines connected to water heaters or stoves. For gas stoves, check the pilot light to ensure proper gas flow. Call emergency services immediately if a home smells like gas.

6. Suffocation

This home injury and cause of death can happen due to food, toys, or household items becoming lodged in an airway or blocking a nose or mouth. Babies and young children are susceptible to putting foreign objects into their mouths, so be sure keep small objects away from them.

7. Cuts

Kitchen utensils like knives, sharp can lids, and tools can lead to cuts. Children who play around the house can fall on sharp furniture corners and get cut. Make sure to disinfect cuts and bandage them appropriately.

8. Pet-related injuries

Cats, dogs, reptiles, fish, and other animals can provide companionship and great comfort to those at home. However, pet-related attacks and accidents cause many at-home injuries. Train dogs and cats to avoid nipping or biting. Keep an eye out to avoid tripping over quick animals.

9. Heavy lifting

During spring-cleaning, make sure to lift heavy loads safely. Lifting incorrectly can lead to back strains, requiring chiropractic adjustments to correct.

10. Exercise-related injuries

Home exercise programs may be a fun and healthy pastime, but they can lead to accidental injuries, such as sprains and bruises. Check with a doctor before starting a new fitness plan and exercise in a well-lit, large space.