We all want our children to grow up and be successful. Studies have shown that adults with at least a high school education will earn more money than those who don’t. The dedication and commitment needed to do well in school is something that is learned early, and in the home as well as at school. We must teach our children that we expect them to do well, and that we are willing to help them succeed. When you have a child who is struggling with school, and you want to figure out a way to help them, try using one of the following ideas to connect with your child and foster a positive learning environment.

Forge A Partnership

Our children’s education is not solely the responsibility of their teachers and administrators that they come into contact with at school. As parents, it is our responsibility to forge a partnership with these professionals and let our children know that we are working together. It’s important that we take the time to visit the school and meet our child’s teachers.

If you deal with a language barrier between you and your child’s teacher, don’t let this discourage you from maintaining a relationship. Teachers are happy to hear from parents in any way, and are more interested in what you have to say than how you say it. As parents, we must do everything we can to foster a relationship with the people who are teaching our children.

Special Services

As parents, it can be hard to admit when our children may have a problem with learning. When our children struggle, we often overlook the problem and try to blame something else. But it’s essential to the future of our children that we are willing to deal with these problems head on and look for ways to help them. If you are concerned with how your child is learning, look into special services that are offered at the school. Many schools offer additional help for reading, along with any other subject that students struggle with. The programs are there to help, and it is up to us to make sure our children are taking advantage of them.

Homework, Homework, Homework

We’ve all had the dreaded argument over homework. It can be exhausting to constantly be reminding our children to do their homework, and at times we may start to feel like we are nagging. But homework is essential to a child’s development in school. Good teachers make sure that the homework that is sent home isn’t just busywork, and that the things our children are doing are really helping them to succeed in school.

If you hesitate to encourage your student to do homework because you are afraid you can’t help them, consider hiring a tutor or having another family member come in to help your child. Make sure your child has the necessary materials to succeed, and speak to their teacher if you are struggling with helping them. Teachers have a genuine interest in helping our children, and they will do all they can to help us help them at home.

Volunteer

Most teachers will need parent volunteers to come into the classroom and help with certain tasks. For those of us parents who work from home and have the opportunity to do this, it can be a huge boost for our children. Students love to see their parents at school, and teachers will see that we have a serious interest in the education of our children and even of their friends. Even if all you can do is volunteer every once in a while to help with a party, this lets your child know that you care and that you are willing to put the time in to learn what is important to them.

Ask Questions

Ultimately, we need to have open relationships with the professionals who take care of our children at school. Sending our children away for seven or eight hours a day can be scary, and we need to trust the people who are watching over them. If you are concerned with something that is going on at school, take the time to visit the school and ask questions. Don’t be put off by someone’s personality that doesn’t agree with yours. Make sure you always feel comfortable with the education your child is receiving and the environment in which they are receiving it.

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