Hi-Tech Kitchen

Image via Masaru Collection

Once upon a time, preparing and eating food was one of the most basic and instinctive things known to man; it all started when man saw fire, put food on it and realised it tasted even better (and was easier to digest).

In 2012, eating has taken on a whole new meaning: an Apple is no longer just an apple and a Blackberry is not just something you pick from a bush…

In the world of ‘kitchenised’ technology, designer kitchens such as those at KDCUK have taken on a life of their own and the future of everyday living and daily kitchen functionality looks very exciting.

Read on for a countdown of some of the greatest techno-kitchen concepts I’ve come across:

4. EGGo Mobile Kitchen – Irina Zhdanova

The EGGo kitchen fits the 2012 adaptability criteria perfectly; it’s literally an egg, you could probably roll the whole thing to wherever you’re going.

EGGo is the perfect solution for camping or festival trips (and to think when I was a child I was impressed by the portable gas stove my father so aptly managed when we went camping…)

The EGGo allows it’s user to be completely self-sufficient and entirely mobile. It’s got a sink, a water reservation tank, a gas chamber and a burner for BBQs.

Its eco friendly and it looks just like some kind of futuristic version of Mork’s egg from the TV show Mork and Mindy.

Speaking of which, does everybody know about Google’s egg fridge?

3. The Alight Kitchen – Altera Design Studio

The Alight Kitchen picks up all the inefficiencies and wasteful aspects of a traditional kitchen space by the scruff of its neck – it’s a compact all-in-one design packed with special features.

On the surface, you’ll see 4 hollow plates that rotate to allow easy access to food and there’s a special compartment for food to determine the optimum temperature to keep it at.

There’s also a section for dishes comprising ‘sockets’ kept clean via a built in dishwasher, and it’s designed with an awareness of eco-efficiency by reusing it’s filtered dirty water.

Suitably, (being called the ‘Alight’ kitchen), it also looks like something made for an airship!

You can see it here

2. Z – Island Kitchen – Zaha Hadid, Ernestomeda, Dupont

The Z Island Kitchen currently lives at the New York Guggenheim having won the Pritzker prize for architectural design.
But this collaboration project wasn’t meant just to be a visually spectacular museum piece; it contains a range of innovations that may genuinely assist future technological thinking in kitchen design.
The Z-island kitchen is aware of the all-encompassing role of the internet and technology in our present lives and addresses this by allowing users to simultaneously navigate the web, download email, watch films and create music playlists if they want to.
This is all via an accomplished touch-control panel, which then goes one step further to create customised aesthetics for the environment – with built in lighting sequences and/or aromatic scents dispensers to give your whole kitchen area whatever feel you like.

1. Heart of the Home Kitchen – Electrolux

With the increased sophistication of touchscreen, we’ve already done away with many unnecessary buttons and keys and interfaces are getting more intelligent by the day.
This means we may be even closer to actually being able to create the Electrolux Heart of the Home Kitchen. If this design worked out, we could be rid of the clutter of pots and pans forever.
This is intelligent technology through and through: By placing an ingredient on the surface of the station, it’s supposed to suggest a list of appropriate recipes to its user, who can then mark off an area with their hands to determine a cooking area. By doing this, they would cause an indentation to work in the place of a pot or pan.
You can see how it would work here:

It hasn’t been implementable yet, but with the recent developments in object-recognition and user-interface interaction, maybe very soon it could be.
It would seem the whole concept of user-friendliness is becoming more literal by the day – so how long now until the majority of these kitchen concepts become commercially available?

Give your best guesses here.


About the Author: Estelle Page is a self-employed interior designer on a mission to make the world a prettier place to live in, one home at a time. Inspired by antique homes and the great outdoors, it’s her passion to help every person to find that perfect balance between aesthetics and functionality in their own home. She’s also a keen DIYer and gardener with an interest in eco-friendly, green design.