I WILL play Words with Friends and you WILL let me!

Call me superstitious, but I do not tempt fate.  I don’t cross the street when the streetlight indicates there’s only 4 seconds remaining, and a two-seater convertible is revving impatiently; I don’t eat non-organic peaches; and I don’t make near-death lane changes on the freeway at 90 mph.  That list grows whenever I fly.  When the downfall (pun intended) potential is as great as 30,000 feet, I want to follow the rules for the safety of others and the sake of my sanity.

So when an arrogant, self-absorbed jackass thinks he’s above following rules and demonstrating common courtesy, something must be done.  In American Airline’s case, kicking the rude blowhard off the plane.  I applaud American Airline’s decision to kick Alec Baldwin off the plane after multiple attempts to ask him to display some common courtesy.

The summary of events is simple: Baldwin was on a plane to New York to shoot the show 30 Rock.  He was playing the online social game, Words with Friends on his cellular phone.  When the flight staff repeatedly requested that he shut off his cellular device because the plane was getting ready to take off, he throws a toddler tantrum and slams the bathroom door.  After he had broken the rules, spat rude comments to the flight staff, and wasted the entire flight passengers’ time, he was rightfully booted off the plane.

Even after he was placed on a subsequent flight to New York, Baldwin still felt compelled to voice the injustice he suffered the most mature way he and a 13 year-old girl knew how: Twitter.  Snarky Tweets like, “flight attendant on American reamed me out 4 playing WORDS W FRIENDS while we sat at the gate, not moving, #nowonderamericanairisbankrupt;” calling the flight staff, “retired Catholic school gym teachers from the 1950s [who found] jobs as flight attendants;” and “now on the 3 o’clock American flight. The flight attendants already look…..smarter.”

After being publicly bashed and reprimanded, Baldwin shut down his Twitter account and issued a public apology.  After all, no sincerity is better than public relations-driven sincerity.