The woman whose sexual harassment claim led to HP CEO Mark Hurd‘s downfall came forward on Sunday and said she never intended for Hurd to lose his job.

Jodie Fisher, an actress who had been employed as a contractor for HP working on customer and executive events, supported Hurd’s claims that there had never been a sexual relationship between them, according to a statement released by her attorney, Gloria Allred:

I was surprised and saddened that Mark Hurd lost his job over this. That was never my intention.
Mark and I never had an affair or intimate sexual relationship. I first met Mark in 2007 when I interviewed for a contractor job at the company.
At HP, I was under contract to work at high-level customer and executive summit events held around the country and abroad. I prepared for those events, worked very hard and enjoyed working for HP.
I have resolved my claim with Mark privately, without litigation, and I do not intend to comment on it further.
I wish Mark, his family and HP the best.

Ms. Allred added:

My client is a single mom focused on raising her young son. She has a degree in Political Science from Texas Tech and was recently the vice president of a commercial real estate company. She formerly worked on the House Select Committee on Narcotics Abuse and Control. She has also been a successful salesperson for a Fortune 500 company and has been in various television shows and films, some of which were R-rated when she was in her 30′s. Most recently, Jodie was one of the stars in an NBC television show called “Age of Love.” Our office does not plan to have any further comment.

HP announced late on Friday that Hurd, one of the country’s highest-profile CEOs, had resigned effective immediately.

The company said its investigation found Hurd had not violated its sexual harassment policy, but that he had violated its standards of conduct policy.

Why I’m covering this story is 1 – because it’s some serious news from a large organization in the technology field and 2 – because I worked for HP for over 12 years and feel the pain this deviation from the core objective has on the employees.

Hurd, who is married, failed to tell the board about a personal relationship with a female marketing contractor who was hired by his office, the company said. Additionally, he filed inaccurate expense account reports in a bid to keep the relationship secret.

Hurd conceded Friday that “there were instances in which I did not live up to the standards and principles of trust, respect and integrity that I have espoused at HP.”

The Palo Alto, Calif., company said its chief financial officer, Cathie Lesjak, will take over as CEO on an interim basis.

[excerpts via]