Here’s an interesting bit of research that recently came out of the Cardiff University School of Psychology – that’s out of the UK…

The results of a new psychological study reveal that the British think people of mixed races are the most naturally beautiful and successful.

Head researcher Dr. Michael Lewis attributes the results to a handful of reasons. In a Darwinian type-theory, mixing between such different genetic backgrounds can create a more “fit” person, who is more attractive as a result. And culturally-speaking, since there are more mixed race people than ever before, more people can identify them. Plus, mixed-race celebs like Leona Lewis have paved the way for Brits to think of ethnic mixture as more beautiful, talented and glamorous.

Conducted at Cardiff University’s School of Psychology, researchers collected a diverse sampling of 1,205 black, white and mixed race faces from Facebook groups – which were then rated by participants on a scale of one to ten by 40 female students.

Mixed-race faces had a 55 percent greater chance of being rated more attractive than either of the single races; and faces rated as “extremely attractive” were overrun by the mixed race submissions.

Dr. Lewis claims the study results represent a larger proportion than one would expect, based on the just three percent existence of mixed race people in British society.

Darwin actually addressed mixed race breeding in a paper put out in 1876, which featured the theory of heterosis, or hybrid vigour. In it, Darwin speculates that cross-breeding will lead to offspring that are genetically stronger than their parents.

“There is evidence, albeit anecdotal, that the impact of heterosis goes beyond just attractiveness. This comes from the observation that, although mixed-race people make up a small proportion of the population, they are over-represented at the top level of a number of meritocratic professions like acting with Halle Berry, Formula 1 racing with Lewis Hamilton, and of course, politics with Barack Obama,” says Dr. Lewis.

Now, I’m no believer of Darwin; I do have 2 children that fit into this research “criteria” – and I’ll be biased and say they are the most beautiful kids I’ve seen in the world (shouts out to my wife for the genes).

Your thoughts? [via]